Bridgeport Vacation Trailer Rentals

Category: Activities

Come See The Show! Leaf Peeping in the High Sierra

We’re at or approaching peak fall color here in the High Sierra. Now that the heat of summer has past, it’s a glorious time to visit us here in Bridgeport for some leaf peeping. In this post, we’re highlighting some of the areas within an easy drive, where you can go to see Nature’s stunning annual show. All it’ll cost you is the price of a tank of gas and an afternoon, to witness the best our lovely wilderness has to offer!

Mono County Fall Color Report

This is the best site to visit if you only have time for one reference about our area’s leaf peeping. Updated weekly, it gives you tips on the best places to go to see the most spectacular autumn foliage. It calls out major areas with a percentage of peak description. As a bonus, it lists:

  • Hike of the Week – for those who like to take in their color on foot
  • Drive of the Week – for those who don’t have time or the inclination to hike but still want to see a magnificent show
  • Upcoming events – For those who like a little sideshow with their leaf peeping

Where to Find Fall Color in the Eastern Sierras

This is a great article over at California Crossings, about 22 forested locations along California’s State Highway 395 corridor, where you’ll find a diverse array of lovely leaves. It offers leaf peeping tips on

  • planning your trip
  • how to reach the area, and
  • locations ranked by elevation

along with

  • a fall color map
  • places to stay
  • road trip essentials

Fall Colors in California

The folks over at Explore Now or Never offer this great little tour of ten spectacular leaf peeping places to see this year. Each location receives star treatment, with

  • an overview
  • special visitor tips
  • photography tips
  • directions
  • where to stay along the way

Whichever sites you decide to visit, let it whet your appetite for some scrumptious fall color, and make Bridgeport your home base in one of our clean, modern trailers set up just for you!

Camping at Altitude

Though the Bridgeport area is—by local standards—relatively low in altitude at about 6,500 feet, some people may still experience some effects of high altitude living around here. Whether hiking, biking, climbing, fishing, or any number of other outdoor activities are on your agenda, we offer the following information to help you prevent or counteract anything that might detract from the enjoyment of the time you spend in our beautiful backyard during your vacation.

High altitude is generally considered those elevations between about 4900 and 11,500 feet. Anything above that is considered very or extremely high, so it’s not relevant to our purposes here.

Healthy Folks

If you’re a fairly healthy person under normal circumstances, at high elevations such as ours, the biggest changes you will notice will concern your breathing. You may experience any or none of the following conditions:

  • Breathing becomes more rapid and heavy.
  • You may occasionally feel short of breath.
  • Your nighttime breathing may change, especially if you already have any obstructive breathing issues such as sleep apnea, or use a CPAP machine.
  • You will likely feel the need to urinate more frequently.

Semi-Compromised Folks

If you’re not in the best of shape, you may experience what’s “altitude stress.” Symptoms of this condition include

  • irritability
  • headache
  • nausea
  • restless sleep

Not-So-Healthy Folks

If your physical condition is moderately impaired, you may find yourself dealing with “Acute Mountain Sickness.” In addition to the previously mentioned symptoms, AMS can also cause you to deal with 

  • dizziness
  • fatigue
  • mental confusion 
  • impaired motor skills
  • Worst-case, if you feel these lower-level symptoms and fail to get to lower altitudes, you could even experience high altitude pulmonary and cerebral edema, which can be fatal.

Preventive Measures

Now obviously, that latter scenario is not only against the odds, but is completely unnecessary. All you really need to do is stay aware of your surroundings and pay attention to how you feel physically, and respond using common sense. Here are some tips to follow to stay safe and enjoy higher-altitude camping at its best:

  • Before a longer stay at high altitudes, try to spend a few shorter-duration periods of 1-3 days at altitude.
  • Begin climbing below the altitude you wish to ultimately go, and don’t ascend more tan 1,000 feet per day. This will allow your body to acclimate slowly.
  • If you feel any uncomfortable symptoms coming on, just go back down. It’s the only cure for altitude-caused discomfort.

We love our mountains here in the High Sierra, but we also know to respect them. If you’re unfamiliar with the way weather conditions can change rapidly at altitude, you need to learn what to expect. During the day, bright, sunny conditions may make you feel that the surrounding air is warmer than it actually is. But as soon as the sun begins to set, we guarantee you’ll begin to feel the difference. Mountain temperatures can drop rapidly, and you can experience high wind events in the peaks at any time, day or night…and often without warning.

Weather Considerations

Be prepared for whatever you might encounter by following these tips:

  • In warm weather or the “shoulder seasons, avoid areas that could attract lightning strikes, such as exposed ground and ridges.
  • Layer your clothing so you can put on and strip off to keep yourself comfortable and adequately protected from the elements. 
  • Avoid exposed mountain passes, which can easily create wind tunnel effects.
  • Choose a sleeping bag adequate to temperatures you expect to encounter.
  • Make sure to bring an expedition or mountaineering style tent when camping at high altitudes.
  • Make yourself easy to find in an emergency by using established campsites.
  • If you expect to encounter ice, wear boots with shanks or crampons to help you dig in.
  • You’ll be closer to the sun, so wear UV-rated protective sunglasses and use a high SPF sunscreen

Staying Fueled Up

Cooking, eating and drinking is affected by altitude. Here are some ways to avoid any issues there:

  • Because you’ll be urinating more often, make sure to bring enough water to keep you hydrated. Avoid alcohol or caffeine, which actually have diuretic effect.
  • This is one time that carbs are your friends. You’ll need them to stay fueled up during your time at altitude.
  • If you go above treeline, you’ll find wood scarce, so you’ll have to pack in your own. We recommend liquid or multi-fuel stoves instead of butane, which won’t find enough oxygen at that height to create a good flame.
  • The decreased air pressure will have the effect of requiring more time for water to boil, so be patient.

Follow these tips, and your time in the High Sierra can be as rewarding and memorable as you hope!

Biking in Mono County…and Beyond!

Whether you ride single-track routes through the forest or take advantage of lift-assisted Mammoth Mountain Bike Park, Mono County is a mecca for mountain bikers.  For road bikers, smooth asphalt roads with minimal traffic and awe-inspiring views make this a cycling paradise.

Here are a few resources for our biker friends who want to bring their rides along when they come to stay with us!

And one for the road…uh, trail! If you’re already hardcore, you might want to get a copy of this book before you head our way: Mountain Biking the Eastern Sierra’s Best 100 Trails.

Beginning Hiker Hacks

So you’ve booked your stay with us, and you’re starting to plan how you’ll spend your time here in California’s breathtaking Eastern Sierra. And you’ve decided one of the things you want to do is become more active. Good for you! Happy is as healthy does, and there’s no easier or more accessible way to start than by enjoying nature’s changing vistas on foot.

Hiking is a perfect activity for the whole family, and it can create a bonding experience like no other. But it does have its challenges, and even on novice level trails, you need to be prepared before trekking out into the wild.

We’ve put together a list of references for beginning hikers here, to help make sure your first forays into our wilderness wonderland are just the start of a long and happy hiking career.

Be serious about preparation and safety, so you can have fun out there and come back to stay with us for years to come!

Why You Should Spend Your Next Vacation in the Mountains

Getting away from clocks, social media, and the clutter of everyday life can be a great way to “reset” your life. There’s something about that sweet, clean, fresh air that city life doesn’t offer. Something about waking up to a few elk outside your door, or a gorgeous sunrise over the peaks convincing you to get out of bed that gives you a great mix of pleasant feelings.

Continue reading “Why You Should Spend Your Next Vacation in the Mountains”